Sunday, September 30, 2012

ShopInterest.co

ShopInterest.Co is a new Pinterest clone startup. The variety of ways webmasters try to hitch their wagons to the Pinterest horse is comedy gold.

Here's how it works. I pin stuff on Pinterest. Then I sign up with ShopInterest.Co, who will upload any pin or pinboard to its own set of servers. I add price tags to my pins, et voilĂ ! ShopInterest.Co has made a copy of my pinboards, except that I can now sell what I have pinned. I plug my state tax rate, connect with my PayPal account, and when someone wants to buy whatever is pinned, I ship it.


...our user base expressed an interest is leveraging Pinterest for selling, and shared with us that there was a lot of duplicative work between selling via Etsy, Ebay and posting in Pinterest
These geniuses have probably heard a lot of uncritical Pinterest hype from the self-appointed Pinterest marketing gurus, but it appears that they haven't bothered to check out Pinterest with their own eyes.

How does a pinboard full of images taken without permission, representing objects pinners can't afford, translates into something the pin hags have the power to sell? Remember, Pinterest frowns upon self-promotion, so how can pinners package and ship other people's things... especially when most of these things are just pretty pictures of objects that aren't for sale?
..it’s not about building a traditional online store – it’s about turning your Pinterest board into a store.
Good luck with that.

1 comment:

ohnostudio said...

"how can pinners package and ship other people's things... especially when most of these things are just pretty pictures of objects that aren't for sale? "

That's a very accurate observation. First off, if such a ridiculous thing gains some traction, I don't think this would sit well with Amazon affiliates or even Amazon itself.

Just as some background, I did work for a stock photo agency, and almost every day, they would get emails and even phone calls about wanting to buy that pair of shoes or that particular lamp. The site visitors had absolutely no clue that it was the image licenses for sale, not the actual items pictured. In this day of hit and run reading, this should be interesting.

And what about price fluctuations? What if they pick one of the item Gold Deals or some such thing, they quote a price, and the next day the price goes back to normal? And what about out of stock situations? Or discontinued product. Someone at ShopInterest has obviously not thought this stuff through.